Prufrock: Floating Uranium Above Alaska, Choosing Your Own Race In Delaware, And Prehistoric Wine

Reviews and News:

Karl Ove Knausgaard takes a literary road trip into the heart of Russia: “For years, I have wanted to see Russia with my own eyes, to meet some of the people who live inside of that entity, to find out what they think it means to be Russian. That is why, early one morning in October, I found myself driving from Moscow to Ivan Turgenev’s estate, accompanied by a photographer and a translator. If I wanted to see what life in Russia was like, unfiltered by news stories, I couldn’t think of any better place to start than Turgenev’s world, the countryside that formed the setting for his first book, A Sportsman’s Sketches.”

Jonathan McAloon writes that T. S. Eliot’s “The Waste Land” is one of the “finest illustrations of general and personal inner turmoil there is.” The editor decides to change “turmoil” to “mental illness” for the title. People on Twitter speculate about whether Eliot had bipolar disorder or not. The poet’s spirit begs Jesus Christ to return and burn everything to the ground...Anyway, the title is unfortunate because it’s not a bad piece about art paired with the poem. The stuff about personal turmoil is, of course, old news.

With unassailable logic, Delaware Public Schools may allow students to choose either their sex or their race without parental consent.

Why was an enriched uranium particle floating above Alaska? No one knows.

Prehistoric wine discovered in Sicily.

Michael Dirda recommends a 19th-century romance—Anthony Hope’s >The Prisoner of Zenda: “Valentine’s Day celebrates romance, but it’s easy to forget that ‘romance’ can refer to more than courtship and sweet nothings. Up until the 20th century, and sometimes still, fiction was regularly divided into two categories: Novels were realistic accounts of contemporary life and manner, often focusing on love and marriage, while romances were adventure stories, characterized by heroic exploits, derring-do and, usually, a certain amount of fantasy.”

Essay of the Day:

Will microschools be the next big thing? That depends, Tyler Koteskey argues in Reason, on how well they are managed and whether they deliver what they promise:

“Portfolio School is part of a growing movement of "micro-schools." Coined by British education blogger Cushla Barry in 2010, the term refers to educational institutions that emphasize interdisciplinary project-based learning, building social skills such as communication and critical thinking, and tailoring instruction to the needs of each individual student.

“The schools tend to focus on teamwork, and they're small by design—with student bodies ranging anywhere from half a dozen to roughly 150 students. The size limitations, informed by anthropologist Robin Dunbar's now famous research on the maximum number of relationships most human beings can comfortably maintain, help the employees stay better connected with their students' individual needs. Portfolio, located in Manhattan's upscale TriBeCa neighborhood, is one of the most elite (and expensive) microschools, focusing on science, technology, engineering, and math (STEM) subjects.

“The movement, which grew from scrappy homeschool roots, has been taken up by nerds who want to hack primary education. Like all startups, the microschool model will rise or fall on its ability to meet customer needs at the right price. Success is far from assured. But could tech-savvy tiny schools be the future?”

Read the rest.

Photo: Riaño

Poem: Maggie Smith, “Now I am My Father”

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Source : http://www.weeklystandard.com/prufrock-floating-uranium-above-alaska-choosing-your-own-race-in-delaware-and-prehistoric-wine/article/2011581

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Prufrock: Floating Uranium Above Alaska, Choosing Your Own Race In Delaware, And Prehistoric Wine

Source:smh.com.au

Prufrock: Floating Uranium Above Alaska, Choosing Your Own Race In Delaware, And Prehistoric Wine

Prufrock: Floating Uranium Above Alaska, Choosing Your Own Race In Delaware, And Prehistoric Wine

Source:NWA Online

Prufrock: Floating Uranium Above Alaska, Choosing Your Own Race In Delaware, And Prehistoric Wine

Prufrock: Floating Uranium Above Alaska, Choosing Your Own Race In Delaware, And Prehistoric Wine

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Prufrock: Floating Uranium Above Alaska, Choosing Your Own Race In Delaware, And Prehistoric Wine